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Looking to the future of Boston Cemetery

Your views are needed to inform a project to safeguard the future of Boston's Victorian Cemetery.

The project will include restoration of the buildings and events and activities to share the history of the site, stories of the people buried there and the wildlife which makes the cemetery its home. The Friends of Boston Cemetery and Lincolnshire Heritage have launched a survey at http://bit.ly/2rIb1ML to encourage members of the public to share their thoughts on how this can be achieved and the kind of activities they would like to see.

The survey asks if you are aware of the cemetery, how you use it and how you would rate some of the projects aims. There's also the opportunity to provide your own ideas and suggestions.

Boston cemetery has a rich history dating back to 1854 when the architect J P Pritchett of Darlington laid out the plans to build twin gothic chapels and the main lodge building. The two identical chapels served the Anglican services to the south side and Nonconformist burials to the north side. In 1961 the Nonconformist chapel was demolished, leaving the Anglican chapel alone and one of a number of buildings now requiring attention.

38,000 burials have taken place and there are 10,000 noted memorials, one of which is the last resting place of Sir Herbert Ingram MP, founder of the London Illustrated News.

The Friends of Boston Cemetery, working with Boston Borough Council, are working on a project to ensure the Victorian cemetery is safeguarded for the future.

Cemetery chapel Displays a larger version of this image in a new browser window

Boston Cemetery 1860 Displays a larger version of this image in a new browser window

Bluebells at Cemetery Displays a larger version of this image in a new browser window